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Edible Cooking Class: How to Poach an Egg

Photography By Erin Feinblatt | December 01, 2013

Ingredients

  • 1 fresh, local egg
  • About 1 tbsp of vinegar (optional)
  • water to boil

Instructions

Break one fresh, local egg into a small bowl. It is important to use good-quality, fresh eggs, because they hold their shape better and have more flavor. Bring a pot of water just up to the point of a boil but before it becomes a vigorous boil. Some people add a teaspoon or so of vinegar to the water to help firm up the egg, but this is optional. With a spoon stir the water rapidly, creating a small whirlpool. Then gently slide the egg from the bowl into the middle of the whirlpool. With a spoon, you can guide some of the stray strands of egg white closer to the center of the egg, but it’s OK if it looks a little messy.

Let it cook for 3–4 minutes or until it appears slightly firm but is still soft when you pick it up with a slotted  spoon. Let the water drain from it while still holding in the slotted spoon or put it on a paper towel for just a bit before serving.

Put an Egg on It
Although a poached egg is a wonderful thing by itself or on toast, why not take it a step further? Many dishes are better with an egg on top, effectively turning a side dish into a main dish. Try a poached egg on top of the Chard and Woodland Mushrooms recipe, on top of a baked potato, on pasta or on top of the Soba Noodle Soup recipe.

*Related Recipes: Seasonal Recipes, Winter 2013-14.

Ingredients

  • 1 fresh, local egg
  • About 1 tbsp of vinegar (optional)
  • water to boil
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